Behind CARMEN.maquia: Kimberly Van Woesik as CARMEN

Kimberly Van Woesik (c) Paula Lobo

Kimberly Van Woesik (c) Paula Lobo

We caught up with company dancer Kimberly Van Woesik, who will be dancing the role of Carmen in our upcoming NYC premiere of Gustavo Ramírez Sansano’s “CARMEN.maquia” at the Apollo Theater. Here’s what she had to say:

What was your reaction when you were cast as Carmen?

When I found out I would be playing the role of Carmen, I was extremely excited and humbled at the opportunity to take on the responsibility of a main character in this story. I feel very fortunate to have this experience be a milestone in my career as I’ve never done a full-length story ballet. I have always been enamored with Gustavo’s unique and athletic movement language; to be playing Carmen in his work is truly a dream come true. It has been the most fulfilling work I’ve ever done mentally, physically, and artistically.

How familiar were you with the classic story of Carmen before you started working on this piece?

I have never actually seen the story of Carmen performed live, as an opera or ballet, but only in online videos. I know that Carmen is a woman with a carefree, selfish attitude, who does what she wants when she wants. She always seems in control regardless of the circumstances she finds herself in. When I found out we would be doing this work by Gustavo I immediately went to YouTube to find a clip of it [premiered with Luna Negra Dance Theater in 2012], and was instantly captivated by how the nuances of his movement brought  each character alive. Without words being used as in song, Gustavo tells the story of Carmen by marrying the choreographic movements to the qualities and intricacies of the music.

How did Gustavo prep you to get into character for CARMEN.maquia?

Each day Gustavo gives me more insight into who Carmen is. At first we learned movement and partnering, then put it to music, and then started working more on character development within each scene. What I appreciate most about Gustavo’s process is that he himself demonstrates a very clear idea of how to physically move in order to portray an emotion or state of being. When I see him do the movement with the intention he’s asking for, it’s so clear that I’m able to grow from what he has shown me. As a very visual learner, I watch him and study how he moves and use it as inspiration for my character. He also allows for my own personal qualities to come through. He encourages the dancers to not have to “act” or “show” the audience how we are feeling or what we are thinking, but to simply just be in the story with each other, interact with the people around you and respond. By having clear intentions with each other, the audience will be able to come into our world, instead of trying to show them a story.

“Carmen is a woman with a carefree, selfish attitude, who does what she wants when she wants.”

How is working on a story ballet different from the other works you’ve done for Ballet Hispanico?

Each work that we do with Ballet Hispanico always has a clear through line of what the intention of the piece is. With CARMEN.maquia we have a very in-depth story with complex, visceral characters. In an evening-length work we are challenged with having our characters evolve throughout the entire story, not just in a short 20 minute piece. Because we are used to doing shorter works, one of the biggest challenges for me is to not feel like I have to reveal all of who Carmen is right away. While the choreography clearly lends itself to do the storytelling,  I have to let my internal dialogue constantly change throughout the work in order to reflect the emotion of what is happening in each scene, while still remaining authentic to the intention and clarity of the movement.

What do you hope to accomplish on stage at the Apollo the night of the NYC premiere?

At opening night at the Apollo I hope to create an intimate space on stage that allows the audience to be captivated by the world that Gustavo has created. I hope for the audience to feel and get lost in our story with us.

-Kimberly Van Woesik

Thanks for your insight, Kim! See Kim and the rest of the company retell the story of Carmen on the Apollo stage on Saturday, November 22. Click here for more details and follow us at #CarmenInHarlem on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Behind CARMEN.maquia: Christopher Bloom as DON JOSÉ

Chris as Don Jose in a dramatic moment of CARMEN.maquia (c) Joshua Preston

Chris as Don José in a run-through of CARMEN.maquia (c) Joshua Preston

Despite the name of the work, CARMEN.maquia is actually a story about Don José, whom you portray. As this is Ballet Hispanico’s first story ballet, can you talk us through what it’s been like taking on a character role, what working with Gustavo is like, and what you hope to accomplish on stage at the Apollo for this one-night-only NYC premiere?

At the outset, CARMEN.maquia‘s narrative form isn’t wholly different from the majority of work we do at Ballet Hispanico. To me, dance always contains narrative and in each work of the BH rep I am always asking myself who I am and what I want at different moments. Some pieces are a series of very short stories, some have a unified through line. Some don’t. The constant is the desire to communicate an idea. The mechanism for that communication is intent within movement. Each piece becomes a series of intents, motivations, and actions. To me, that is story.

CARMEN.maquia takes this process a step further in two main ways. The first is that the story is told over the course of somewhere around 65 minutes. This allows for a great deal of narrative detail. The second step is that this story is specific and set.

“Dancers do not have the benefit of words.”

When Bizet created the opera he told his story using words. My experience with words is that they are the form of communication that offers the most potential for specificity of meaning. Dancers do not have the benefit of words. This makes every single movement crucial to the audience’s understanding of the narrative. It also leaves the interpreters (i.e. the dancers)  with a great deal of agency in deciding how the story will be told. I imagine that Bizet’s poetry gives singers a huge amount of information about how they should play their characters–I do not have that information.

Choreographer Gustavo Ramírez Sansano is guiding me in my portrayal of Don José, but he is not making decisions for me. He has offered me the freedom to remake Bizet’s protagonist in an image of my choosing. Don José’s actions are my landmarks. The brunt of every tragedy is the fall from grace. In CARMEN.maquia, Don José commits three great transgressions that drag him into the dirt. My work in developing this character is deciding how I arrive at each of these watershed moments. I know that Don José falls in love with a meritless woman, I know this leads him to abandon his brothers in arms and I know that, unable to cope with Carmen’s rejection, Don José murders the woman he loves.

But how does a military officer, a principled man justly proud of his position and moral character, fall so far; fully abandoning the values on which his life has been built? That question is the source of my portrayal of Don José.

“It is an exciting place where people move fast, no one hides who they are, and people bleed blue.”

My hope for the performance at the Apollo on Nov. 22 is to be able to bring the audience into the world of CARMEN.maquia that Gustavo has built. It is a different world from the one in which we live. It is an exciting place where people move fast, no one hides who they are, and people bleed blue. When standing on the Apollo stage, facing those three towering tiers of people, what I want is to give every audience member an intimate experience. I want each of them to walk away feeling like we danced solely for them.

-Chris Bloom

Thanks for your insight, Chris! Click here for more details and to purchase tickets for this one-night-only Apollo performance on Saturday, November 22, and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for more about #CarmenInHarlem.

School Spotlight Q&A: Kiri Avelar, Associate School Director

Every new year always brings exciting changes to Ballet Hispanico, and this year is no different. Members of our School of Dance community may have noticed a familiar face in a new role around the studios lately. Flamenco Program Advisor Kiri Avelar recently joined the School of Dance’s administrative team as the new Associate School Director.

We’re thrilled to have Kiri in this new position and caught up with her to learn more about herself, to see how the transition has been, and to hear what plans she has for the new school year:

Kiri Avelar Headshot 2014

Kiri Avelar (c) Rebecca Wilson

Many people might just know you as one of our flamenco instructors, but you have quite a varied background in dance, both in styles and geographic locations. Could you share with us just a summary of your journey with dance, and how you came to find Ballet Hispanico?

I started my training in ballet. The older I got the more varied our curriculum became. Studying at the Boston Ballet School at age 14, I was introduced to Spanish dance in a class taught by Ramon de los Reyes. I didn’t care much for other styles at that age, and I was so focused on ballet that was all I cared about. I later received my B.A. in Dance in New Mexico. Flamenco and Spanish dance are huge there, and because of my ballet and Spanish dance base I easily assimilated into that community; I had an immediate in-road. I eventually fell in love with the art form of Flamenco, but never let go of my respect for ballet and modern dance. Looking back I can see how all of the pieces of my life’s puzzle fit together, now bringing me to Ballet Hispanico in New York.

Give us a sample of what your daily tasks look like now as an administrator for the School:

You can find me either in the classroom teaching, observing other faculty members teach, walking through the building to make sure kids get to class on time, or greeting families. The hours I spend behind the desk are dedicated to processing scholarships, working closely with School leadership and our advisors, and checking in with our marketing team.

What is it like to balance being both an administrator and a faculty member and advisor in the School?


Kiri in the studios (c) Paula Lobo

I love my job. I am so at home in the studio, and yet there is a side of me that is fascinated by the arts administration that it takes to support that work – I get to work in the best of both worlds! I am able to see both sides of the coin, and I feel my work in one area informs my work in the other.

What’s one goal you have for the School of Dance this year?

To provide enrichment opportunities (performances, workshops, lectures, etc.) for our students that will further support their learning inside the classroom.

In an alternate life, if you weren’t dancing, what would you be doing right now?

Creating SOMETHING….!

Thanks for catching up with us, Kiri! Keep an eye on our blog for our next School Spotlight Q&A.



Summer Recap: From our Dancers





We’re happy to see our dancers back in the studios for the new season–but have you ever wondered what they do in their off time? We caught up with some of our company dancers to see how they spent their summers. Click on a dancer to hear from them!









Dancer Travels: Lauren and Martina Visit Ecuador!

Martina and Lauren enjoying the outdoors.

After what has certainly been a packed touring schedule, our dancers finally had some time off to rest and relax and enjoy some summer! We love that so many of them still spend their off time with their fellow company dancers–can’t get enough of that #BHamor! We caught up with Lauren Alzamora, who recently spent time in Ecuador with Martina Calcagno:

I traveled to Ecuador for the first time 8 years ago, to visit my family and the birthplace of my father (Quito, Ecuador). I knew he hadn’t visited since he was 14, and he celebrated his 60th birthday this past February – I thought it would be a perfect excuse to plan a return trip, and now here we are together (along with some other family from the US). I invited my dear friend and fellow BH dancer Martina Calcagno and she has been fully initiated into the Alzamora family.

Always a dancer, wherever you go!

So far we have had two family reunions, represented BH at Mitad del Mundo (the equatorial line) and admired the beautiful buildings and churches of Quito Colonial. We observed the lush vegetation and colorful hummingbirds of Mindo, the rainforest. We took a long day trip to Otavalo for the famous artisan market and ate the typical food of the Andes. Still on the agenda: a trip to the majestic volcano Cotopáxi and a ride on the Teleférifo to view Quito from above. Luckily for us, in the midst of relishing all the local food and drinks of Ecuador, we have managed to locate a fully equipped Pilates studio to stay in shape :) Not to mention, the Alzamora cousins will be taking us out for salsa dancing at a discoteca before we leave…. This vacation has been a wholly enriching experience and I can hardly wait to plan our next trip to Ecuador!

-Lauren Alzamora

Thanks for sharing, Lauren–can’t wait to have you girls both back in the studios!

Instituto Coreográfico 2014: Q&A with Dance Filmmaker Kendra Brisco

Instituto Coreográfico, Ballet Hispanico’s choreography lab for artists, is an innovative program for both burgeoning choreographers and emerging filmmakers. Our latest installment of the program welcomed filmmaker Kendra Brisco to BH. Kendra is a recent graduate of DeSales University, receiving a B.A. in both Dance and TV/Film. She has interned with the American Dance Festival and Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival  where she worked closely with professional companies from all over the world documenting their work. We asked Kendra to reflect back on her two week residency with us and she shared some fascinating insight–read below!

Kendra Brisco_Headshot_14You might be our first Instituto filmmaker who is also a dancer. When or how did you decide to pursue both dance and filmmaking, and what is it about the mix of the two that intrigues you?

At a young age I realized that I had two very strong passions. Once I realized this, doing something else never crossed my mind. Even though I was the first student at my school to pursue this double major, I was convinced that these two art forms were meant to be combined.

Being a dancer, I understand not only the body and how it moves, but I have a special sensitivity to movement and I am able to react to it. Because of my familiarity with the choreographic process, I can easily pull out the choreographer’s main points and understand how they connect to the creation of the work.

When I film dancers, I feel myself dancing with them, and it is one of the best feelings in the world!
You’ve documented many dance rehearsals on film already–is there anything about this project with Miguel and Ballet Hispanico that stands out to you as being different?

What stood out to me the most was how open the dancers were to new exercises and new ways of thinking. I got to watch the gears turning in their heads and observe the external changes as well. They were constantly sharing insight into their internal experiences that added a whole new layer to the rehearsal process. Miguel’s methods for drawing emotions out of the dancers had me captivated the entire time. I never wanted to leave the studio!

When I film dancers, I feel myself dancing with them, and it is one of the best feelings in the world!

What guides you when you edit these short videos?

When I edit, the most important thing to me is that the feeling you get from watching the video is the same feeling as actually being in the studio. I try to stay as true to reality as possible.
Can you share with us your favorite bit of insight you heard throughout the residency, whether it was from Miguel, the dancers, your mentor Gerrit, or anyone else?

What really stuck with me was Miguel’s point about finding yourself and being yourself. So much of the time we are “acting” or “pretending,” instead of just being. I found that to be true of life outside the studio as well, and I think anyone would benefit from searching for his or her true self. This was an inspiring process that has definitely made me think about the world a bit differently now.

Thanks for all you’ve done for us, Kendra! Watch Kendra’s documentation of Instituto in the two videos below:




And check out her other work on her dance-film reel here.

Instituto Coreográfico 2014: 10 Minutes with Miguel Mancillas

For the latest installment of Instituto Coreográfico, Ballet Hispanico’s choreography lab for Latino artists, we welcome Mexico-based choreographer Miguel Mancillas to our studios to work with our dancers. We caught up with him recently for a quick chat on the experience, which will culminate tonight in a public showing. Here’s what he had to say on this collaborative process:

IMG_0761How have you approached working with the Ballet Hispanico dancers?
I find it really interesting the way dancers believe in their skills and training and what they know or understand about their own body. For me it’s really, really important to build communication with dancers so we can go farther together. It’s hard to build on their movement or ask for their own movement without them having trust in you. I love to respect that because I believe that they are all artists, not just people who can move.

Is it a challenge that you’re only spending 2 weeks with the dancers?
Not really, for me it’s more like a laboratory work process and at the same time I’m just trying to know them as much as possible, and also to see what they think about my ideas. For example, what is an animalistic thing or an instinct? What does it mean to own your body, if you really think that you make decisions for your body, or is it your mind, or is it society? We were working in different approaches to that.

For them, it has been a real challenge in that way, but at the same time they know how to do a lot of things—they are really good dancers. Some of them enjoy much more to challenge themselves. But I think it’s little things that I can say to them, like to be sure that they are are not lying to themselves, but not for me. To me, I would never know, but for them, they would know.IMG_0877

As a choreographer, what do you gain from a program like Instituto Coreográfico?
For me, I’m making them do things that I already do with my dancers, but I like to see where they feel more challenged and where they feel more fine, so they can take that movement and use it as their own. I make a lot of images in my mind and I work with that, but I also don’t just like to have them try to do something that is already in mind, something that I’ve predicted–it’s better to search together.

“I believe that they are all artists, not just people who can move.”

How would you describe your style of your choreography?
It’s really hard–I always say that each piece makes me be different. Sometimes I go really abstract, sometimes I go with storytelling. But, I have the same obsession: what makes us move? Sexuality, fears of being alone, and the vulnerabilities we have as a species. We are the weakest. We have a great brain but our body is really weak. And so, I feel like we build a lot of masks around that, and that is in all of my pieces.


Gracias, Miguel! We look forward to seeing your work!


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